Teflon chemicals in food packaging
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Most people know that Teflon chemicals are in cookware. However, chemical coatings used in food packaging have proven to break down into Teflon chemicals as well. Scientists are investigating human exposure from oil, stain, and grease repellent coatings on paper and cartons such as french fries boxes, sandwich wrappers, and microwave popcorn bags.

"According to 3M Company testing, Teflon chemicals are present in the blood of about 95% of people living in the United States. [PFOA or C8] linked to the coatings on take-out food cartons and raincoats is 'likely' to cause cancer in humans, according to a draft report by a panel of an independent advisory board to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Scientists are not sure how the chemical - perfluorooctanoic acid - is getting into people, but it is found widely in human blood throughout the United States. Some researchers say the source is the deterioration of water- and grease-repellant coatings used on carpets, raincoats and takeout-food boxes,” Philadelphia Inquirer, June 29, 2005.

More about Teflon chemicals Dupont knew that chemical coatings were unsafe

A former top Dupont scientist, Glenn Evers, revealed in November of 2005 that Dupont has known since at least 1987 that Teflon coatings were unsafe for use in food packaging.
According to Evers, Dupont hid studies showing the risks of Teflon chemicals in candy wrappers, pizza boxes, microwave popcorn bags, and hundreds of other food containers. Internal Dupont documents show that Dupont had safe alternatives available but chose not to use them because they were more expensive.


Which companies use Teflon chemicals?

Ohio Citizen Action has been identifying certain brand names which contain Teflon chemicals. One of these products is Orville Redenbacher's microwave popcorn, made by ConAgra. ConAgra acknowledged using Teflon chemicals in food packaging in a letter to Ohio Citizen Action in September, 2005.

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